Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87). So sad summer is ending, but I am finally taking advantage of all the tomatoes I have in my garden! Here’s this week’s meal plan…

Pictured below is The Skinnytaste Meal Planner where I plan my dinners for the week (you can of course use any meal planner). Meal planning is a great way to get organized before heading to the supermarket to get ready for the week! My breakfast is usually something quick like eggs with fruit, a smoothie or avocado toast. We’re a family of four, so if a recipe serves more, it’s either packed up for everyone’s lunch or eaten the next day as leftovers. If you would like to see some of the previous week’s dinner plans, click here

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87)

Monday: Best Skinny Eggplant Rollatini with Spinach and a salad
Tuesday: Blackened Fish Tacos with Cabbage Mango Slaw
Wednesday: Pepper Steak with brown rice
Thursday: Chicken and Shrimo Laap (Larb)
Friday: Naked Salmon Burgers with Sriracha Mayo
Saturday: Dinner Out
Sunday: Spaghetti with Sauteed Chicken and Grape Tomatoes

(more…)

Original Source: Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 87)

Garlic Shrimp in Coconut Milk, Tomatoes and Cilantro

Garlic Shrimp in Coconut Milk, Tomatoes and Cilantro is a quick stew cooked in a light, tomato coconut broth with a hint of lime and cilantro. Simple enough to make for a weekday dinner yet sophisticated enough to serve to company. Serve with a little brown basmati rice to soak up the delicious broth.
Garlic Shrimp in Coconut Milk, Tomatoes and Cilantro is a quick stew cooked in a light, tomato coconut broth with a hint of lime and cilantro. Simple enough to make for a weekday dinner yet sophisticated enough to serve to company. Serve with a little brown basmati rice to soak up the delicious broth.
A quick shrimp stew cooked in a tomato coconut broth with a hint of lime and cilantro. Simple enough to make for a weekday dinner yet sophisticated enough to serve to company. Serve with a little brown basmati rice to soak up the broth.

Garlic Shrimp in Coconut Milk, Tomatoes and Cilantro is a quick stew cooked in a light, tomato coconut broth with a hint of lime and cilantro. Simple enough to make for a weekday dinner yet sophisticated enough to serve to company. Serve with a little brown basmati rice to soak up the delicious broth.

(more…)

Original Source: Garlic Shrimp in Coconut Milk, Tomatoes and Cilantro

The Eternal Dilemma: Revenge or Forgiveness?

By Leo Babauta

It’s easy to get upset at someone who has hurt you — but what’s the best way to get them back? What kind of revenge, served cold perhaps, can you dream up?

I recently had someone write to me about this:

“Recently one of my family members hurt me badly. They believe I am an easy target since I don’t want to retaliate or cause conflicts. My question is should I take the risk of getting revenge, knowing that it is never ending (not the best solution) or should I forgive this person? The problem is I don’t want to let them walk over me anymore. How to make them stop and respect me? Or maybe there is another solution?”

There are some important issues going on here:

  1. You’ve been hurt, which isn’t nice. It certainly doesn’t feel nice.
  2. You want to lash out at the person for hurting you. This is a natural reaction from the anger and indignation that can result from being hurt.
  3. You don’t want someone to walk all over you. This seems unfair, and seems like it’s just adding to the bad treatment.
  4. You want to be respected.
  5. You are worried about the bad consequences of getting back at them.

I’m obviously going to argue against revenge, so I should just say that now rather than acting like it’s going to surprise you. Instead, let me present my arguments against revenge, then offer up a different approach.

A Few Arguments Against Revenge

So why not just do what feels right, and lash out at them somehow?

There are some big problems with that:

  1. It doesn’t actually make you feel better. Retaliating might feel good in the moment, but you won’t feel better about yourself. You’ll just be sinking to a lower level and feeling bad about yourself.
  2. It hurts the relationship. You lash out because you’re hurt, but in doing so, you’re going to hurt and anger the other person. Your relationship actually gets worse. You might argue that it’s their fault, but actually, no, you’re contributing to this as well. You might argue that you don’t care, you don’t want a relationship with a person who would hurt you, and that might be true. Just be sure you’re not saying that out of anger, but you’ve calmed down and made that rational assessment.
  3. You’re just allowing yourself to act on impulse and fear. When we lash out at someone because they mistreated us, it’s not from a rational assessment of what will be best for us, or best for the situation. It’s an impulse that is borne from fear and anger. While this is a natural reaction, I’ve found that it’s not the best idea to just follow our impulses without pausing to consider. This leads to impulse problems like eating too much junk food, distraction, procrastination, addiction to video games or TV, and more. Instead, we should get in the habit of pausing whenever we have an impulse, letting the fear subside, and instead considering what’s best for the situation. We shouldn’t let ourselves get caught up in a story in our heads about what this person did to us and how wrong they are. That’s not helpful.
  4. It doesn’t actually make people respect you more. Lashing out in anger or fear is not a recipe for earning people’s respect. In my experience, people actually respect you less if you retaliate against others. Maybe they’ll want to be around you less. But that’s out of fear or dislike of your behavior, not respect. I tend to respect people more who can handle things maturely and with calmness and compassion.
  5. You’re not being your bigger self. It’s easy to act on our impulses, but what we really want is to become out bigger self. That means the best version of ourselves that we can be —
    and forgiving ourselves, of course, when we don’t do that. The bigger self is one that forgives, is compassionate, doesn’t act out of fear or anger, and handles things maturely. This isn’t always easy to do, so we shouldn’t think of it as an “ideal” to always strive for, but as a guideline for how to act when we’re able to consider things with calmness.

So if retaliation and revenge aren’t the best ideas, what’s better?

A More Compassionate Approach

I believe a more compassionate approach is better, because:

  • You’re being your better self.
  • It makes you feel better about yourself.
  • You earn the respect of others by being more mature.
  • It helps your relationships.
  • It is a kind thing to do to the other person, who is obviously having difficulties.
  • It makes the world a better place, one relationship at a time.

You might disagree with these reasons, but I’ve found them to be true.

Here’s how to do it.

  1. Pause instead of acting on impulse, fear and anger. Notice when you’re about to lash out from anger and fear. Instead of acting on that impulse, pause. Breathe. Take a timeout. Consider your actions before acting.
  2. Stay with the physical feeling, instead of the story. When you’re angry or afraid, there is a story in your head that’s causing it (“They’re being so rude!”) … instead of dwelling on this story, bring your attention to how this feels in your body, physically. Where is the feeling located — in your chest, stomach, neck, face? What physical sensations can you notice? Stay with these feelings as long as you can, returning to them when you notice your attention going back to the story (“Why do they need to act this way?”). Stay with the feeling, and give it some compassion.
  3. Enlarge your perspective to see their difficulty. Once you’ve stayed with the feeling for a few moments, see if you can get out of your you-centered story, and embiggen your perspective to include what the other person is going through. Are they having a bad day? Are they suffering through some difficulty? Feeling fear or anger? Do you know what it’s like to go through that yourself? When you realize the other person is probably having a difficult time, struggling with something … you might find some compassion in your heart for what they’re going through, in addition to the offense you feel. This is the space you want to enter.
  4. Ask: What is the most compassionate thing you can do for both of you? Is it having a gentle conversation with them? Is it ending the relationship so you don’t hurt each other? Is it getting a third party involved so you can resolve the situation? Is it just listening to their complaints? There are lots of options — try to consider ones that don’t originate from your anger or fear, but instead are compassionate.
  5. What do you need to do to respect yourself? I’m not suggesting that you be a “pushover” and let other people walk all over you. Compassion isn’t about not respecting yourself — in fact, it’s the opposite. You often need to take steps to protect yourself, so you don’t get hurt. Or at least to speak up for yourself. It’s not compassionate to remain silent when you’re being hurt. But at the same time, you can respect yourself if you make your concerns clear in a gentle way. Or set your boundaries with the other person firmly, but without anger.
  6. What’s the most loving thing you can do for them? This might be listening to them, giving them a hug, showing them that you care. But it also might be letting them go, because your relationship with them isn’t helping them. Or creating some space, at least for a little while, so they can have time to cool down (and you can too). There are lots of options, but considering this along with how to love and respect yourself, is where you want to be.

None of this is easy. I’m not claiming there are miracle solutions. But it’s not easy to hurt your relationship with escalating retaliations, and it’s not easy to deal with resentment and anger in yourself. Compassion isn’t easier, but it does bring greater happiness all around

The Magic of Forming New Relationships

I’d like to invite you to join me in my new course in the Sea Change Program to help others get good at making friends and dating … it’s called “The Magic of Forming New Relationships,” and it has just started. Join me!

The course features a guest expert, other than myself … my good friend Tynan, who is a blogger, author, coach and expert on topics ranging from minimalism, travel, productivity, habits, social dynamics, awesome cruise travel and much more. Tynan is a former pickup artist (he’s a good person, I swear) who learned to not suck at talking to girls, not suck at storytelling, and apply what he learned to making friends. I’m honored to have him as a guest expert.

So what’s this course about?

We’ll talk about making new friends and also dating — both involve getting out of our comfort zone and making new connections. It can be life-changing stuff.

Here are the video lessons — the first two have just came out:

  1. Overview — What Most People Do Wrong at First
  2. The Approach (Or, how to get someone to want to talk to you)
  3. The Art of Storytelling
  4. The First Three Dates
  5. The Preliminaries: Developing Your Confidence
  6. Making a Great Connection
  7. Building a Friendship (or Romantic Relationship)
  8. Avoiding Long-Term Pitfalls

It’ll be amazing. We’ll also talk about telling good stories, creating a great experience for the other person, and other awesome stuff that will help anyone, no matter where you are in life.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Every week this month I’ll publish two video lessons
  2. There’s a challenge to spend 5-10 minutes each day to working on one of the skills presented in the video lessons
  3. There are weekly check-in threads in the forum and discussion threads for each lesson
  4. I’ll hold a live video webinar on with a talk and a Q&A session on Aug. 19

This is all included in my Sea Change Program, which you can sign up for today. You also get access to a huge library of other courses and content for changing your life, one step at a time.

Original Source: The Eternal Dilemma: Revenge or Forgiveness?

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein

Just ’cause I’m currently dashing around the country on my Ready or Not! book tour doesn’t mean I can’t serve up a recipe for Paleo Chicken Chow Mein!

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Eager Nomsters who preordered our brand new cookbook, Ready or Not!, and submitted the form for extra thank-you gifts before August 1 already have this recipe—it was included in our exclusive One and Done e-book of hassle-free one-pot/one-pan meals. That goodie has expired, but I figured this chow mein’s too good not to share.

I know—some of you are probably looking at this picture and scratching your head because you’ve either never heard of chow mein, or you’re accustomed to chow mein looking like something else entirely. Well, for starters, chow mein is a stir-fried noodle dish and a staple of Chinese-American cuisine—but its ingredients and preparation can vary widely. On the West Coast, chow mein noodles are typically soft and cooked together with the accompanying meat and veggies, while on the East Coast, the noodles are fried super-crispy (a.k.a. Hong Kong style) and served beneath a pile of cooked ingredients (and/or a thick brown gravy). On the East Coast, stir-fried soft noodles are usually called “lo mein.” Lo mein is rarely found on the menus of Chinese restaurants on the West Coast.

My Paleo-friendly version is kind of a mish-mash of both styles, combining the softer noodles (or in this case, sweet potato noodles) of the West Coast with some crispy bits more reminiscent of East Coast chow mein. This is the way I like my chow mein ’cause it reminds me of the way my mom and dad used to tag-team this recipe every weekend: My dad would patiently pan-fry the noodles while my mom made the gravy topping with veggies and meat. Right before serving, my parents would combine their finished components, Voltron-style. I think this may be one of the only dishes my mom ever allowed my dad to help with in the kitchen in all their years together.

Enough nostalgia—it’s time to cook!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 5 tablespoons avocado oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos, divided
  • 1 teaspoon aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder
  • 1 pound white-fleshed (e.g., Hannah) sweet potato or 6 medium carrots, peeled and spiralized
  • Diamond Crystal brand kosher salt
  • 1 small yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • ¼ pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced thinly
  • 1 (1-inch) piece of ginger, peeled and cut into thin coins
  • 2 scallions, cut diagonally into ½-inch segments
  • 5 ounces baby spinach
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Equipment:

Method:

Place the chicken pieces in a medium bowl. Pour in 1 tablespoon avocado oil and 1 tablespoon coconut aminos. Add the aged balsamic vinegar, fish sauce, sesame oil, and arrowroot powder, too.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Stir well to combine, and set aside.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Next, heat a large skillet over medium heat. When the skillet is hot, Add 2 tablespoons of avocado oil. Once the oil is shimmering, add the spiralized sweet potato noodles (swoodles!) in a single layer.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Fry undisturbed for 2 to 3 minutes so that some of the swoodles start to brown and crisp. (But don’t let the swoodles burn!)

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Sprinkle on ½ teaspoon of salt, and carefully flip the swoodles over. Cook the swoodles undisturbed for another 2-3 minutes. Transfer the swoodles to a serving dish.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Heat the now-empty skillet over medium-high. Then, add 2 tablespoons of avocado oil. Once the oil is hot, add the thinly sliced onions and sauté with a liberal sprinkle of salt. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until softened.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Toss in the mushrooms, ginger slices, and another sprinkle of salt.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Stir-fry for about 2 minutes or until the mushrooms are cooked and the ginger is fragrant. If the pan is looking a little dry, feel free to add another tablespoon of oil.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Add the chicken and cook, stirring, until no longer pink.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Stir in the scallions and the spinach. Season the meat ’n veggies with 1 tablespoon coconut aminos and red pepper flakes. Taste and adjust the seasoning as needed.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Once the spinach is wilted, plate the chicken and veggies atop the swoodles.

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Chow down on your chow mein!

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com


Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!


PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Paleo Chicken Chow Mein

Prep 10 mins

Cook 20 mins

Total 30 mins

Yield 4 servings

This Whole30-friendly Paleo Chicken Chow Mein is a delicious and healthy weeknight meal that uses spiralized sweet potato in place of noodles!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 5 tablespoons avocado oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos, divided
  • 1 teaspoon aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder
  • 1 pound white-fleshed (e.g., Hannah) sweet potato or 6 medium carrots, peeled and spiralized
  • Diamond Crystal brand kosher salt
  • 1 small yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • ¼ pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced thinly
  • 1 (1-inch) piece of ginger, peeled and cut into thin coins
  • 2 scallions, cut diagonally into ½-inch segments
  • 5 ounces baby spinach
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Place the chicken pieces in a medium bowl. Pour in 1 tablespoon avocado oil and 1 tablespoon coconut aminos. Add the aged balsamic vinegar, fish sauce, sesame oil, and arrowroot powder. Stir well to combine, and set aside.
  2. Next, heat a large skillet over medium heat. When the skillet is hot, Add 2 tablespoons of avocado oil. Once the oil is shimmering, add the spiralized sweet potato noodles (swoodles!) in a single layer.
  3. Fry undisturbed for 2 to 3 minutes so that some of the swoodles start to brown and crisp. (But don’t let the swoodles burn!)
  4. Sprinkle on ½ teaspoon of salt, and carefully flip the swoodles over. Cook the swoodles undisturbed for another 2-3 minutes. Transfer the swoodles to a serving dish.
  5. Heat the now-empty skillet over medium-high. Then, add 2 tablespoons of avocado oil. Once the oil is hot, add the thinly sliced onions and sauté with a liberal sprinkle of salt. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until softened.
  6. Toss in the mushrooms, ginger slices, and another sprinkle of salt. Stir-fry for about 2 minutes or until the mushrooms are cooked and the ginger is fragrant. If the pan is looking a little dry, feel free to add another tablespoon of oil.
  7. Add the chicken and cook, stirring, until no longer pink.
  8. Stir in the scallions and the spinach. Season the meat ’n veggies with 1 tablespoon coconut aminos and red pepper flakes. Taste and adjust the seasoning as needed.
  9. Once the spinach is wilted, plate the chicken and veggies atop the swoodles.

Notes

Orange-flesh sweet potatoes will not get crunchy and may be too mushy for this dish. Spiralized carrots, Russet potatoes, or Yukon Gold potatoes are good alternatives if you can’t find white-fleshed sweet potatoes.

Courses Dinner

Cuisine Paleo, Whole30, Primal, Chinese, Gluten-free

 

The post Paleo Chicken Chow Mein appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Original Source: Paleo Chicken Chow Mein

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 86)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 86).  I can’t believe that summer is starting to wind down and that in many areas schools are already back in session! Good luck to all of you who have started or are getting ready to start school! Hope everyone has a great week!

The Skinnytaste Meal Planner is where I plan my dinners for the week (you can of course use any meal planner). Meal planning is a great way to get organized before heading to the supermarket to get ready for the week! My breakfast is usually something quick like eggs with fruit, a smoothie or avocado toast. We’re a family of four, so if a recipe serves more, it’s either packed up for everyone’s lunch or eaten the next day as leftovers. If you would like to see some of the previous week’s dinner plans, click here

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 86)

Monday: Late Summer Vegetable Enchilada Pie
Tuesday: Leftovers
Wednesday: Instant Pot Chicken Tikka Masala with Cauliflower and Peas with garlic naan
Thursday: Giant Turkey Meatball Parmesan with salad
Friday: Fish Fillet with Tomatoes, White Wine and Capers
Saturday: Dinner Out
Sunday :Balsamic Roasted Veggie and White Bean Pasta (more…)

Original Source: Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 86)

New Course: The Magic of Forming New Relationships

By Leo Babauta

It can be really difficult when you aren’t good at talking to people, at making friends, or at dating. It can stress you out, get you down, make your life harder.

I consider myself an introvert, but I’ve made a concerted effort in my life to get better at making friends and socializing. So it’s possible.

I’ve created a course in my Sea Change Program to help others get good at making friends and dating … it’s called “The Magic of Forming New Relationships,” and it has just started. Join me!

The course features a guest expert, other than myself … my good friend Tynan, who is a blogger, author, coach and expert on topics ranging from minimalism, travel, productivity, habits, social dynamics, awesome cruise travel and much more. Tynan is a former pickup artist (he’s a good person, I swear) who learned to not suck at talking to girls, not suck at storytelling, and apply what he learned to making friends. I’m honored to have him as a guest expert.

So what’s this course about?

We’ll talk about making new friends and also dating — both involve getting out of our comfort zone and making new connections. It can be life-changing stuff.

Here are the video lessons — the first one just came out:

  1. Overview — What Most People Do Wrong at First
  2. The Approach (Or, how to get someone to want to talk to you)
  3. The Art of Storytelling
  4. The First Three Dates
  5. The Preliminaries: Developing Your Confidence
  6. Making a Great Connection
  7. Building a Friendship (or Romantic Relationship)
  8. Avoiding Long-Term Pitfalls

It’ll be amazing. We’ll also talk about telling good stories, creating a great experience for the other person, and other awesome stuff that will help anyone, no matter where you are in life.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Every week this month I’ll publish two video lessons
  2. There’s a challenge to spend 5-10 minutes each day to working on one of the skills presented in the video lessons
  3. There are weekly check-in threads in the forum and discussion threads for each lesson
  4. I’ll hold a live video webinar on with a talk and a Q&A session on Aug. 19

This is all included in my Sea Change Program, which you can sign up for today. You also get access to a huge library of other courses and content for changing your life, one step at a time. I hope you’ll join me, I’m really excited!

Original Source: New Course: The Magic of Forming New Relationships