Matcha Coconut Gummies

These Matcha Coconut Gummies are the jade-colored jigglers you need in your life.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

No, these are not little hand soaps.

Like many food obsessives, I’m crushing hard on matcha, coconut, and gelatin these days—and not just ’cause they’re good for you. There’s been plenty written about how these ingredients are antioxidant- and nutrient-rich “superfoods” that help fight inflammation, boost metabolism, promote gut and joint health, and protect against a host of diseases. (Want to learn more? Here’s a great article about gelatin, and one about matcha.)

But let’s get real: I didn’t make these green-tea-infused gummies because I think they’ll turn this frumptastically frazzled mommy into a supermodel with lustrously thick hair, dewy skin, and a killer gut-lining. For me, any benefit from the purported health-boosting properties of this stuff is just the cherry on top.

The real reason I made these jiggly treats? Because matcha, coconut, and gelatin combine deliciously. Plus, my Matcha Coconut Gummies turn out super cute with the right molds. And sometimes, cute trumps all.

I mean, COME ON. They even look like emojis, for cryin’ out loud.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

A few notes about this recipe:

  • If you’ve never tasted matcha (which is a special type of finely milled green tea powder), try before you buy. Go order a matcha drink at your local hipster coffee/tea hangout, and take a sip or three before deciding whether to drop a small fortune on a fancy tin of green powder. (Good quality matcha ain’t cheap, people!) Matcha mixed with hot water can have a grassy, vegetal flavor loaded with umami; while the taste is not for everyone, I—and most people I know—happen to adore it. I prefer matcha to coffee. When it’s blended into a latte drink, the grassy matcha flavor is muted, and you end up with a tasty, creamy beverage that gives me a calm alertness. Personally, I dig this brand of matcha, but I also buy cans of matcha at my favorite tea shop and at Japanese markets.
  • Make sure you procure a high-quality gelatin derived from grass fed animals. (I like this one.) You are what you eat, remember? Also, take care to buy gelatin and not collagen peptides for this recipe. Why? Because collagen peptides won’t gel, which means your gummies won’t firm up. Ever.
  • Feel free to add more or less honey based on your preference. I like my gummies just mildly sweet, so a single tablespoon of honey is the perfect amount for me. Henry, on the other hand, prefers gummies with no added sweetener whatsoever. And my nine-year-old wishes I’d dump in the whole honey jar.
  • Don’t like coconut? You can swap out the coconut cream for your favorite non-dairy milk or Whole30-friendly creamer. Just remember to keep the ratio of gelatin-to-liquid consistent.
  • If you aren’t using molds, it’s not necessary to add as much gelatin. You can decrease the amount of gelatin to 2 tablespoons to produce a less-gummy, more-Jell-O-like texture. But if you’re using molds, stick with the amount of gelatin listed in the recipe.
  • After testing this recipe a bunch of different ways, I can tell you that your choice of blender will affect the look of your final product slightly—but it’s not a deal breaker. If you use a high-powered blender, the gummies will be a uniform, creamy-green color throughout. But if you use an immersion blender or a less powerful blender, your gummies may separate a bit and settle before it solidifies. Not a big deal—and hey, it all ends up in the same place (your mouth!)—but something to keep in mind.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Makes 12 gummies (I usually eat 2 at a time!)

Ingredients:

  • 2½ tablespoons gelatin (use only 2 tablespoons if you are not using molds)
  • 2 cups coconut water, divided
  • 1 tablespoon honey (optional)
  • ¼ cup coconut cream (or the hardened stuff that floats to the top of a can of chilled full-fat coconut milk)
  • 2 teaspoons matcha

Equipment:

Method:

Got yourself some cute silicone molds? Good.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Pour 1 cup of coconut water in a bowl or beaker, and sprinkle the gelatin on top. (My coconut water is pink because I used Harmless Coconut Water. (Here’s why it’s pink, in case you’re curious.) No biggie if yours is clear or colored; the gummies will turn out green regardless.)

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

The gelatin will take about 5 minutes to bloom (or soften).

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

In the meantime, heat the remaining 1 cup of coconut water (and honey, if you’re using it) over medium heat…

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

…until steaming, but not boiling.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Pour the hot coconut water into the container with the bloomed gelatin. Add the coconut cream…

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

…and matcha.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

The brighter and greener the matcha, the higher the quality!

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Blend with a high speed blender…

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

…or an immersion blender.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Pour the matcha mixture into silicone molds or into an 8-inch square baking dish.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

If you’re using silicone molds, place them on a rimmed baking sheet before adding the liquid. That way, you can transfer them to the fridge without the molds flopping around and spilling.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

Chill the gummies in the fridge for at least 2 hours or until they’ve solidified. Then, pop them out!

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

You can keep these gummies in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, but I bet you’ll finish ’em off before then.

They’re super-cute and tasty no matter if they’re two-toned and speckled…

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

…or creamy green!

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com

The color and shine remind me of my favorite jade necklace, which I wear pretty much ALL THE TIME because it gives me superpowers. Really.

Then again, maybe I derive my powers from matcha and gelatin. And emojis.

Matcha Coconut Gummies by Michelle Tam http://nomnompaleo.com


Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!


PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Matcha Coconut Gummies

Prep 5 mins

Cook 15 mins

Total 20 mins

Yield 12 gummies

Yes, these gummies are made with “superfoods” like matcha, gelatin, and coconut, but the real reason I made ’em is because they’re super cute and tasty.

Ingredients

  • 2½ tablespoons gelatin (use only 2 tablespoons if you are not using molds)
  • 2 cups coconut water, divided
  • 1 tablespoon honey (optional)
  • ¼ cup coconut cream (or the hardened stuff that floats to the top of a can of chilled full-fat coconut milk)
  • 2 teaspoons matcha

Instructions

  1. Pour 1 cup of coconut water in a bowl or beaker, and sprinkle the gelatin on top. The gelatin will take about 5 minutes to bloom (or soften).
  2. In the meantime, heat the remaining 1 cup of coconut water (and honey, if you’re using it) over medium heat until steaming, but not boiling.
  3. Pour the hot coconut water into the container with the bloomed gelatin. Add the coconut cream and matcha.
  4. Blend with a high speed blender or an immersion blender.
  5. Pour the matcha mixture into silicone molds or into an 8-inch square baking dish.
  6. If you’re using silicone molds, place them on a rimmed baking sheet before adding the liquid. That way, you can transfer them to the fridge without the molds flopping around and spilling.
  7. Chill the gummies in the fridge for at least 2 hours or until they’ve solidified. Then, pop them out!
  8. You can keep these gummies in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, but I bet you’ll finish ’em off before then.

Notes

  • If you’ve never tasted matcha (which is a special type of finely milled green tea powder), try before you buy. Go order a matcha drink at your local hipster coffee/tea hangout, and take a sip or three before deciding whether to drop a small fortune on a fancy tin of green powder. Personally, I dig this brand of matcha, but I also buy cans of matcha at my favorite tea shop and at Japanese markets.
  • Make sure you procure a high-quality gelatin derived from grass fed animals. (I like this one.) Also, take care to buy gelatin and not collagen peptides for this recipe, because collagen peptides won’t gel, which means your gummies won’t firm up. 
  • Feel free to add more or less honey based on your preference. 
  • Don’t like coconut? You can swap out the coconut cream for your favorite non-dairy milk or Whole30-friendly creamer. Just remember to keep the ratio of gelatin-to-liquid consistent.
  • If you aren’t using molds, it’s not necessary to add as much gelatin. You can decrease the amount of gelatin to 2 tablespoons to produce a less-gummy, more-Jell-O-like texture. But if you’re using molds, stick with the amount of gelatin listed in the recipe.
  • Your choice of blender will affect the final outcome slightly. If you use a high-powered blender, the gummies will be a uniform, creamy-green color throughout. But if you use an immersion blender or a less powerful blender, your gummies may separate a bit and settle before it solidifies. Not a big deal, but something to keep in mind.

Courses Snack

Cuisine Paleo, Gluten-free, Matcha

The post Matcha Coconut Gummies appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Original Source: Matcha Coconut Gummies

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