Episode 336 – Dennis McKenna – Drugs, Psychedelics, and Ethnopharmacology

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This episode we have ethnopharmacologist, research pharmacognosist, lecturer and author Dennis McKenna. Join in as we chat about drugs, psychedelics, ayahuasca, and more.

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Guest: Dennis McKenna

Article mentioned in the podcast: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/09/12/the-ayahuasca-boom-in-the-u-s

Facebook page (speaking events listed here): https://www.facebook.com/dennisjonmckenna/

Website for the book: The Brotherhood of the Screaming Abyss

 

30 Day Guide to the Paleo Diet

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Original Source: Episode 336 – Dennis McKenna – Drugs, Psychedelics, and Ethnopharmacology

A Short Guide to Starting, if You’re Struggling

By Leo Babauta

I know a lot of people who fall into a slump, losing the habit of exercise, procrastinating with work, slipping into a bad diet, and generally not feeling motivated.

It’s hard to get out of a slump like that.

It’s hard to get going again, to get started when all the forces of inertia are against you.

Here’s how to get started, in just a few easy steps.

  1. Pick one thing. Pick just one change. People who want to change their lives usually want to change everything at once. But trust me, one change is enough for now: go for a short walk, do a few pushups, eat a fruit for breakfast, do a 5-sentence journal every morning. Not all of these, just pick one! Focus on it for the next month.
  2. Send a friend an email. Just a quick email, asking for help. Tell them you’ve been slumping, but you’re going to stick to one change. Ask them to keep you accountable — if you don’t do what you promise every day for a month, you owe them something big (or embarrassing). Make it something powerful, so you definitely won’t allow yourself to fail.
  3. Promise to do something ridiculously easy. Tell your friend you’re going to do something every day — but something super easy. Again, go for a 5-minute walk. Do just a few pushups every morning. Do a journal of just 5 sentences each day. The easier the better. Again, trust me on this one. You want it so easy you can’t say no.
  4. Create unmissable reminders. Put a huge sign somewhere you won’t miss it. Reminders in your email, calendar, phone. Ask people around you to remind you. Put a rubber band around your wrist. Don’t let yourself forget!
  5. Build trust with a single step. Every day, you just need to take one step. Just write one sentence in your journal. Just do one pushup or yoga pose. When you take that step, do it mindfully and with gratitude and joy. Smile. Enjoy that tiny victory. With that step, you’re building trust in yourself. When you see yourself want to put it off, pause. Breathe. Stay with the urge to run away but don’t let yourself run. Smile, and do the habit anyway.

With every single step, you’ll feel better. When you finish that step, take the next one. You’ll trust yourself more and more, and eventually you’ll be able to add another small habit, then another the month after. And soon you’ll be kicking butt, happy you’re moving in a good direction, smiling with gratitude with every good thing you’re doing for yourself.

Original Source: A Short Guide to Starting, if You’re Struggling

Navy Bean, Bacon and Spinach Soup (Pressure Cooker, Slow Cooker or Stove Top)

Bacon makes everything better (in my opinion), especially in this hearty white bean soup. It's delicious, inexpensive, and easy to make and leftovers are even better the next day. I made this in my Instant Pot (doesn't get quicker than that!), but I've also included slow cooker and stove top directions as well.

Bacon makes everything better (in my opinion), especially in this hearty white bean soup. It’s delicious, inexpensive, and easy to make and leftovers are even better the next day. I made this in my Instant Pot (slow cooker, electric pressure cooker, rice cooker, steamer, yogurt maker in one) but I’ve also included slow cooker and stove top directions as well.

Bacon makes everything better (in my opinion), especially in this hearty white bean soup. It's delicious, inexpensive, and easy to make and leftovers are even better the next day. I made this in my Instant Pot (doesn't get quicker than that!), but I've also included slow cooker and stove top directions as well.

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Original Source: Navy Bean, Bacon and Spinach Soup (Pressure Cooker, Slow Cooker or Stove Top)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 43)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 43)

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 43).  This past week my focus was on family, I was lucky enough to celebrate my cousins’ 50th birthday in Florida, and enjoy a few days at Disney World with my family. Now my focus is on the upcoming release of my new cookbook, Skinnytaste Fast and Slow. Thank you to all who have pre-ordered, I hope you are as excited as I am!

One of the recipes on this week’s dinner plan are scallop tostadas, these are SO good and can only be found in the free 42-page bonus pack I shared this week for anyone who pre-ordered the cookbook. If you pre-ordered, simply fill out this form to download it. If you are on a phone or iPad and have issues downloading, please email skinnytaste@penguinrandomhouse.com and they will re-send you the link.

Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 43)

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Original Source: Skinnytaste Dinner Plan (Week 43)

What’s the Most Loving Thing You Can Do?

By Leo Babauta

The question I’ve been asking myself lately, before I do anything, is a deceptively simple one: “What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation?

Now, that might sound corny to some of you, might seem irrelevant to most of you. But give me one minute of your time to explain.

I’ve been experimenting for awhile with letting go. Not running when I have uncertainty, fear, discomfort. Not acting on my fears or frustrations. Not letting these things drive me, but sitting still with them instead, and facing them with courage.

That’s wonderful, but what if you actually need to act? You could sit still all day, but then you’d never help anyone, never create anything, never do anything.

So there’s a need to not act, to sit still … and there’s a need to act. How do we determine which is which?

By asking that question. “What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation?”

When you’re about to take an action (including running away, going away from uncertainty to comfort, procrastinating, going to distractions or comfort food) … stop and sit still.

Turn inward and see if fear or stress is coming up, see if you’re feeling uncertainty and wanting to cope by getting control. See if you’re trying to comfort yourself, or to lash out, to close down.

In this case, the most loving thing you can do is nothing.

The most loving thing you can do, for yourself and others, is to sit still. Face the fear and uncertainty. Not act out wanting to control these emotions, wanting to comfort yourself.

But in other cases, you want to take action. Doing your work, for example, could be something that helps you or your team or the world. Taking care of someone, talking to them, being there for them, serving them … those can be very helpful things to do.

In these cases, acting to help yourself or someone else is the most loving thing you can do.

If I’m going to read with my kid, take a walk with my wife, clean the kitchen for my family, write a book for my readers … these are loving acts.

If I’m running to check email or social media because I want something easy to do instead of writing that book for my readers … the loving act is to sit still and face this discomfort, fear and uncertainty.

When I’m talking to someone out of frustration, the most loving thing I can do is to refrain from trying to criticize or control them or be defensive. Instead, I can face this frustration. When I calm myself down, I can talk to them in a loving way and try to help them, try to empathize with them, try to be there for them.

Each time I’m about to act, the best thing I can do is ask that question: What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation? I might not always remember, but when I do, it is always a helpful question.

Note: If you’d like to dive into mindfulness, check out my Beginner’s Guide to Mindfulness here.

Original Source: What’s the Most Loving Thing You Can Do?